Hep C Discussion Forum

Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Chatbox
Please log in to join the chat!
Post Info TOPIC: Liver Fibrosis Improvements after SVR measured by Fibroscan


Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 3397
Date:
RE: Liver Fibrosis Improvements after SVR measured by Fibroscan
Permalink  
 


Hi Canuck,

A large study about 10 years ago examined patients with cirrhosis who achieved SVR with Peg/Riba. The study numbers were fairly small ( about 100 from memory). We didn't have Fibroscan so patients had follow-up biopsies.

The results showed 50% regressed by at least 1 stage after ~3 years, 25% were unchanged and 25% showed worsening of fibrosis. It has been hoped that SVR using the DAA's may show better results.

My Hepatologist believes that regression will take longer- at least 5 years. The higher the Fibroscan score pre-treatment, the longer it will take for regression.

Hopefully, now the number of SVR's are increasing, we'll see some better figures. Cheers.



__________________

Geno 1b, IL28B CT,  x3 prior relapser,  ex-cirrhotic, 75 yo, did 48 weeks with Victrelis/Peg./Riba.  VL 1.28m at start, UNDET. at 8 ,12 ,16 ,24 ,30  and 48 weeks.  EOT 15 Feb 2013 , UNDET. at EOT + 28 weeks. SVR!  Still Undet. at EOT +5 years

Malcolm



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 3194
Date:
Permalink  
 

Hey Pablo!,

Maybe beating HCV and getting an Fscore reduction only FEELS like it takes 111 years!

I think this beating HCV is going to be so much more easy now, no longer such a Roman colosseum lion pit spectator sport!, on the other hand, your sporting events sound rather ... well, gruelling.

Ya, that looks good!, I'll have some of what your having then - an F1 for me too please.

I like Mallani's (personal) "unrealistic" expectations (as opposed to him being chided for his wants) - his work doing fibroscans now should help settle how long it takes to see fibrosis reductions.

Glad yer back.

Hey, speaking of fibrosis .... you never did answer my "study" ques. (over in "I'M IN! -) .... ! biggrin C.



__________________

HCV/HBV 1973. HBV resolved. HCV undiagnosed to 2015. 64 y.o. F. Canada.

GT3a, Fibroscan F3/12 kPa - F4/12.6 kPa, VL log 7.01 (10,182,417), steatosis, high iron load.

SOF/VEL with/without GS-9857 trial - NCT02639338.

SOT March 10 - EOT May 5, 2016 - SOF/VEL/VOX 8 week trial.

 

(SEE UPDATES IN BIO)



Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 363
Date:
Permalink  
 

Thanks for this Canuck.

I've read this paper before and a similar one, which showed similar results.  I'd take a one stage regression, which would put me back at F1 - I could live with that.

It's interesting that there are far fewer studies around fibrosis regression post SVR than there are treatment trials.  Less sexy a topic for researchers, I would say, but given the advent of DAAs and the associated high rates of SVR hopefully more 'recovery' studies will be done.

On a side note, my rugby team (Ireland) play Canada next week.  The Canadian rugby team are called 'The Canucks'.  I still can't believe I didn't know what Canuck meant before.  The Irish team have just beaten the world champions, New Zealand, for the first time in 111 years of trying!  And they did it in the Chicago Cubs stadium the week after they won the world series, also after a century of trying!  I never thought I'd see Ireland beat the All Blacks in my lifetime; so it seems 2016 is my year what with sof/vel/vox and all...anyway, I'll shut up now as this is a HCV forum and not a rugby one.

Pablo



__________________

44 y.o. male, HCV G4 since 1996, F-scan score 9, F2, Failed prior I/R, finished sof/vel/vox 8 weeks 5/16, pre-treatment VL 2 million, EOT UND, EOT+4 UND, EOT+12 UND.



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 3194
Date:
Permalink  
 

This is not a very new article, and, it is a small number of participants who were Fibroscaned that provide these stats, but I still felt I had to post it, because it just repeats what we hope for - that for many of us, our fibrosis levels will improve after SVR, as indicated by decreasing hardness detected by fibroscan.  smile C.

AASLD 2015: Liver Fibrosis Improves after Successful Treatment for Chronic Hepatitis C    

Thursday, 19 November 2015     Written by Liz Highleyman

A majority of chronic hepatitis C patients with advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis showed improvement in liver health following treatment, according to study findings presented at the 2015 AASLD Liver Meeting this week in San Francisco. However, the researchers identified few demographic, laboratory, or disease-related factors that could predict who would experience fibrosis regression and who would have worsening liver damage.

Over years or decades chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can lead to advanced liver disease including cirrhosis, liver cancer, and liver failure requiring a transplant.

Prior studies have shown that treatment with interferon-based therapy for hepatitis C, as well as tenofovir (Viread) for hepatitis B, can lead to some reversal of fibrosis and reduced risk of hepatocellular carcinoma and liver-related death. Direct-acting antiviral agents used in interferon-free regimens can now cure upwards of 90% of people with hepatitis C, but it is not yet known how treatment response will be reflected in long-term clinical outcomes.

Ana Maria Crissien from the Scripps Clinic in La Jolla and colleagues looked at the association between sustained virological response at 12 weeks post-treatment (SVR12) -- recognized as a cure -- and regression of advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis as determined by FibroScan elastography imaging. Long-term follow-up will assess changes in the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma and the need for ongoing liver cancer screening.

Liver biopsy has traditionally been considered the ''gold standard" for determining the extent of liver fibrosis, but clinicians are increasingly using less expensive non-invasive imaging methods and biomarker indexes. Elastography uses shear waves to assess liver elasticity or "stiffness." Higher liver stiffness scores (measured in kiloPascals or kPa) are associated with more advanced liver damage; a score below 6.0 kPa suggests absence of fibrosis while a score above 14.0 kPa indicates cirrhosis.

The researchers conducted a retrospective chart review of data from chronic hepatitis C patients with advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis (according to clinical features, FibroScan, or biopsies) who achieved sustained virological response to treatment. This was followed by prospective FibroScan and clinical assessments at 6-month intervals after SVR.

Of the 224 participants at Scripps who were eligible for the study, the present analysis included 100 patients, of whom 35 had advanced fibrosis and 65 had cirrhosis at baseline. Of the remainder, 110 were still awaiting analysis, 3 declined to participate, and 11 were excluded (1 due to transplantation and 10 due to additional causes of liver disease such as hepatitis B or heavy alcohol use).

About 65% of patients in the present analysis were men, most were white, and the mean age was about 59 years. Most had HCV genotypes 1a or 1b. The most commonly used treatment was the first-generation HCV protease inhibitor telaprevir (Incivek or Incivo) plus pegylated interferon/ribavirin, followed by sofosbuvir (Sovaldi) plus simeprevir (Olysio), pegylated interferon/ribavirin alone, sofosbuvir/ledipasvir (Harvoni), and sofosbuvir plus pegylated interferon/ribavirin; overall, 45% used regimens containing sofosbuvir

Results

·         Among the 35 participants who had advanced fibrosis at baseline, 69% demonstrated improvement by at least one fibrosis stage, 14% remained unchanged, and 17% worsened to cirrhosis.

·         Among the 65 people with cirrhosis at baseline, 55% showed improvement and 45% remained unchanged.

·         Taken together, 60% improved, 34% had no change, and 6% worsened.

·         Median time to improvement was 2.5 years for people with advanced fibrosis and 3.0 years for those with cirrhosis at baseline, indicating that those with less severe liver injury improved faster.

·         The researchers identified few factors that predicted fibrosis improvement or worsening.

·         There were no significant associations with patient sex, age, race/ethnicity, obesity, most medical conditions, or most complications of cirrhosis.

·         However, diabetes and varices (enlarged veins in the stomach or esophagus) were associated with a lower likelihood of fibrosis improvement.

·         Most laboratory tests including albumin and platelet counts showed no association with changes in fibrosis.

·          Fibrosis improvement was significantly associated with changes in ALT and AST liver enzyme levels and APRI (AST-to-platelet ratio index) scores, but patient numbers were small and the clinical relevance of this is unclear.

·         In a sub-analysis of 6 people with HCV genotype 3 -- which is associated with more aggressive liver disease -- all but 1 (83%) showed regression of fibrosis.

·         Among the 5 people who had developed hepatocellular carcinoma by the end of follow-up, 2 had improved fibrosis, 2 remained unchanged, and 1 worsened.

In summary, this study showed an "overall 60% improvement in subjects with baseline cirrhosis or advanced fibrosis after achieving SVR based on FibroScan," the researchers concluded, suggesting that APRI might be used to predict regression in subjects with advanced fibrosis.

11/19/15

Reference

AM Crissien, WB Minteer, JJ Pan, et al. Regression of Advanced Fibrosis or Cirrhosis Measured by Elastography in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C who Achieve Sustained Virologic Response after Treatment for HCV. AASLD Liver Meeting 2015. San Francisco, November 13-17, 2015. Abstract 108.

 

 

 

·          

 

 



__________________

HCV/HBV 1973. HBV resolved. HCV undiagnosed to 2015. 64 y.o. F. Canada.

GT3a, Fibroscan F3/12 kPa - F4/12.6 kPa, VL log 7.01 (10,182,417), steatosis, high iron load.

SOF/VEL with/without GS-9857 trial - NCT02639338.

SOT March 10 - EOT May 5, 2016 - SOF/VEL/VOX 8 week trial.

 

(SEE UPDATES IN BIO)

Page 1 of 1  sorted by
 
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.

Legal Disclaimer:

THIS FORUM, IT'S OWNERS, ADMINISTRATORS, MODERATORS AND MEMBERS DO NOT AT ANY TIME GIVE MEDICAL ADVICE AND IN ALL CASES REFER ANYONE HERE TO SEEK APPROPRIATE MEDICAL ADVICE FROM THEIR DOCTOR.